‘What could my hip pain be? I’ve had an ache for months’

Dec 15, 2019
Mary's been experiencing pain in her hip so severe it's stopped her from doing the things she enjoys. Source: Getty Images

Here’s how it goes. You wake up. Something aches. Something continues to ache. That same thing aches for a few weeks. You curtail your jogging. You avoid high heels. Finally, you go online in a quest for answers. You’re shown a spider web of meridians travelling up and down your body. At 2am you’re wondering: Is it arthritis? Maybe a tumour? Perhaps you’re about to have a stroke. Or is it menopause? The possibilities are endless.

Diagnosing an ailment is like going on a scavenger hunt. You try and try, and if you’re lucky, you finally find what you’re looking for. Usually, a doctor gives you six minutes before you’re ushered out of the office with a prescription in your hand. You feel grateful that it’s only $350 for one month.

I’ve had an ache in my hip for two or three months. It’s becoming a good friend of mine, following me wherever I go. Actually I’m getting quite fond of it. A day without this ache is a lonely one, so to speak.

I’ve tried cutting down on swimming. I’ve abandoned golf. Tennis anyone? I don’t think so! My thighs are getting as wide as the freeway. For those who are athletically inclined, maybe this is the penance we pay for years of pounding ourselves into the ground. We look great at 30, and when we’re official AARP members (America’s association of retired persons), we creak like rusty pipes.

It’s onward, in the quest for relief. Most schools of thought suggest going to a specialist. Doctors spend years in medical school trying to find answers to our ailments. But since they are in ‘practice’ I think they are simply making an educated guess as to what’s wrong with you. And we have to pay them anyway.

What if we simply paid doctors based on whether they properly diagnosed our problems? It would be an incentive plan. Hey, it works for salespeople. Maybe doctors would be better at getting to the root of an ailment if we paid them for results, not for simply making an educated guess.

To date, I have seen three doctors regarding my hip pain. My first visit, an orthopaedic doctor, turned into a discussion of golf, cycling and swimming. Nice guy. Very handsome. Probably travels a lot. He gave me a cortisone shot in my elbow, as that was bothering me more, and completely ignored my hip. I guess they can only treat one part of the body at a time. That way, you can always come back again for subsequent ailments, and of course an additional charge.

I then went to a chiropractor. He had just eaten a banana before he adjusted me. I thought I was in Costa Rica with the primates as he leaned over and coaxed me into exhaling while he snapped every vertebra in my spine. I felt pretty good for a while until they asked me for $250. Apparently they wanted to get as much of the deductible from my insurance company before I left their office. Turns out they were unable to communicate with my provider, which only required a $15 co-pay for my initial visit. No more snap-crackle-pop for me.

I then went to an acupuncturist. After being turned into a pin cushion, several electrodes were put on various parts of my body, grinding into my butt, spine and lower back like a rotor tiller. Maybe she was practising contour farming, who knows? The experience was relaxing, especially the part where I got the free massage, but a day later, the hip discomfort returned. Goodbye wave music and incense.

I now understand that this is perhaps part of getting older. Ailments of various denominations come and go for no apparent reason. I have one more appointment scheduled with a prominent doctor at the University of California, Los Angeles but he seems to cancel every time I make an appointment.

I’ll keep you posted.

Do you have a story to share with Starts at 60? We want to publish it. Sign up as a contributor and submit your stories to Starts at 60. Stories written by over-60s go into the draw for some great weekly prizes. You can also join the Starts at 60 Bloggers Club on Facebook to talk to other writers in the Starts at 60 community and learn more about how to write for Starts at 60.

Join the community that will get you through the hard times ahead.

Starts at 60 is the community you need when Covid-19 is changing life as we know it. We stick together, help each other, share information and have a whole lot of fun online.

Join for interactive online events, expert advice, timely news, great deals and community conversation.

Have you suffered pain and discomfort? How long did it take you to get a diagnosis?

Please sign in to post a comment.
Retrieving conversation…
Stories that matter
Emails delivered daily
Sign up