What is your maiden name? 11



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The decision to change your name after marriage can be a difficult decision. It’s a big part of your identity and can symbolise who you are as a person and who you are in your career. However, it is still is very popular to do so. Did you change your name? 

There are a variety of reasons why women decide to keep their name. Increasingly this is because of practical, not political reasons. In other words, women aren’t keeping their names for feminism; they’re keeping them for convenience.

In 1855, American equal rights activist Lucy Stone made a profound statement by maintaining her maiden name after she married. Even in the 1970s, in places like Australia and the US, it was a slap in the face of society to keep one’s family name. And it caused practical complications. In some states in the US, women were still required to use their husband’s name to vote, do banking or obtain a passport.

Today, the world can cope better with the messy realities of life, which is probably why we’re seeing a slight upturn in the trend for women to keep their maiden names. Just as it’s incredibly easy to change your name after marriage, it’s just as easy not to. Or to change it back if your marriage ends. At worst, it makes you difficult to track on social media!

Have you stuck with tradition or kept your maiden name during marriage and/or divorce? What about your daughters? What did they choose?

Starts at 60 Writers

The Starts at 60 writers team seek out interesting topics and write them especially for you.

  1. back in 1959 we had no choice it was your grooms name and that was it, nothing wrong with Robinson as my maiden name, but I am proud to be married to a Boreham

  2. I kept my name. Didn’t even consider changing it.
    I always remember my mother, who was an artist, saying it was really difficult to sign her paintings with her married name. Her art came from within her, Mitzi Z, (her maiden name) not Maria P (her married name).
    Perhaps that was always at the back of my mind…i am who i was born as…and i wasn’t changing my name when I married because that would change who i was…..also it would make it difficult in the future if anyone was trying to find me…how many people have you lost track of because they changed their names.

  3. I changed my name as you did without thinking back in 1971. I have remarried since and changed it again. On reflection I would keep my maiden name if I had the thought it through. Don’t like double barrelled names though. The kids should probably have the Dads name.

  4. I changed my name back in the sixties when I married. I divorced and went back to my maiden name. When I remarried I kept my maiden name as it was easier particularly in the work force as it would have meant changing my business cards etc. My clients would not know who I was as my reputation had already preceded me.

  5. I married in ’81 and kept my maiden name. My husband’s mom and dad were not happy about it but my mom was thrilled. I guess I was a bit of a rebel to my in-laws. Wore a knee length beige dress that I bought at a second had store as my wedding dress along with with baby blue one inch heel shoes. We didn’t want a sit down dinner but rather an open house reception at my parents. That was the last straw for my father-in-law. He booked us a hall, ordered the dinners and presented it to us as our wedding gift. 👰

  6. way back when we did take the hubbys name , never thought of it not

  7. Use my maiden name as my middle name now. Daughter uses hyphenated last name.

  8. Always kept the maiden name. Good thing too!!

  9. Changed my name nearly 35 years ago and love it. I loved my maiden name but got sick of poor pronunciation and spelling (Roalf-sounds like Rolf) happily an Austin.

  10. When you sign the marriage cert you sign your maiden name after my separation I went straight back to my maiden name and will always keep that even if I remarry.

  11. Married in 1983 and kept my maiden name, Was easier for work. My husband didn’t mind but my mother in law was not happy

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