Harry and Meghan release series of unseen snaps from romantic African getaway

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Prince Harry and Meghan during a trip to Botswana in 2017. Source: Instagram/ sussexroyal

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex made their debut on Instagram earlier this week, delighting fans by sharing a previously unseen photo from their time in Fiji as part of their first post on the social media site.

Now the royal couple have done it again, sharing a host of never-before-seen pictures with their fans, giving them an insight into their romantic trip to Botswana in August 2017, which took place just three months before their engagement was announced by Buckingham Palace.

Prince Harry and Meghan, who will celebrate their one year wedding anniversary next month, released the personal snaps to their new Instagram account showcasing their time together in the African country.

The young royals also revealed previously unknown details of their trip and the conservation work they undertook in a lengthy caption, which was shared alongside the series of photographs.

The first image shows Harry hugging an environmental worker, while another shows the duke chatting with a group of young children. A third photo shows the duke and duchess working together to put a special satellite collar on an elephant, followed by a short video of the elephant getting back on its feet.

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The Duke of Sussex attends the ‘Our Planet’ premiere at the Natural History Museum with The Prince of Wales and The Duke of Cambridge, lending their joint support for the protection of our environment. As president of @africanparksnetwork, The Duke of Sussex continues to advocate for the communities and wildlife that coexist in some of the most vulnerable environments around the world. Be it human wildlife conflict or natural disasters, these communities (park rangers, school children, families) are on the frontline of conservation and we must do more to help them as we also work to safeguard the animals and landscapes that are in critical danger. A few recent photos that look back on: Prince Harry’s long time commitment to this cause as well as a glimpse into the work he and The Duchess of Sussex did in 2017. Their Royal Highnesses travelled to Botswana to assist Dr. Mike Chase of Elephants Without Borders in equipping a bull elephant with a satellite collar. Approximately 100 elephants are poached/killed every day for their ivory tusks. Using satellite technology allows conservationists to track their critical migratory patterns and to protect them and the local communities from human wildlife conflict. The elephant pictured was sedated for just 10 minutes before he was up and back with his herd. Tracking his movements has allowed conservationists to better protect him and other elephants and ensure heightened protection for these beautiful creatures moving forward. Photo credit: PA, Image 1

A post shared by The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (@sussexroyal) on Apr 4, 2019 at 12:33pm PDT

“As president of @africanparksnetwork, the Duke of Sussex continues to advocate for the communities and wildlife that coexist in some of the most vulnerable environments around the world,” the post read.

“Be it human wildlife conflict or natural disasters, these communities (park rangers, school children, families) are on the frontline of conservation and we must do more to help them as we also work to safeguard the animals and landscapes that are in critical danger.”

The post continued to explain the prince’s recent work in the area of conservation, in particular his love of Botswana and travels to the country with wife Meghan.

Prince Harry hugs an environmental worker in Botswana.
Prince Harry hugs an environmental worker in Botswana. Source: Instagram/ sussexroyal

“Prince Harry’s long time commitment to this cause as well as a glimpse into the work he and the Duchess of Sussex did in 2017,” it read. “Their Royal Highnesses travelled to Botswana to assist Dr. Mike Chase of Elephants Without Borders in equipping a bull elephant with a satellite collar.

“Approximately 100 elephants are poached/killed every day for their ivory tusks. Using satellite technology allows conservationists to track their critical migratory patterns and to protect them and the local communities from human wildlife conflict.

“The elephant pictured was sedated for just 10 minutes before he was up and back with his herd. Tracking his movements has allowed conservationists to better protect him and other elephants and ensure heightened protection for these beautiful creatures moving forward.”

Prince Harry interacts with children during a trip to Botswana in 2017.

The country holds special significance to the young royals who have travelled to Botswana twice during their relationship. According to magazine Harper’s Bazaar Harry and Meghan first traveled there only a few weeks after they met.

“She came and joined me for five days out there, which was absolutely fantastic,” the magazine reported Harry said. “Then we were really by ourselves, which was crucial to me to make sure that we had a chance to get to know each other.”

Botswana made such an impact on the couple, that the duchess’ engagement ring even includes a centre diamond from the country.

Are you a fan of Prince Harry and Meghan? What do you think of the work they do to help others?

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