The best shoes for those annoying foot problems

When it comes to our feet, a myriad of problems tend to arise as we get older and the years of stress and impact begin to take their toll.
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For many, this discomfort comes in the form bunions, arthritis, heel pain, swollen or cracked feet, collapsed arches and more. As if dealing with the pain these conditions can cause isn’t frustrating enough, they can also make buying comfortable yet attractive shoes a much more difficult task.

There are good-looking yet therapeutic shoes out there, though, with brands such as Homyped offering stylish and comfortable shoes that are specially designed to accommodate a range of foot issues.

Lizzy (C+ width) – Perfect for easing bunions and collapsed arches


This style is a great option for anyone suffering from painful bunions, with a soft, cushioned panel that helps relieve pressure around sore points and protect the area from bumps. The Lizzy style also features Homyped’s Momentum Footbed, which was developed with podiatrists to help support the arch and stabilise the foot. It’s one of the most advanced pieces of footwear technology on the market and helps shape and support the foot, as well as improve posture and guide the foot back into its correct alignment with your ankles and legs.

Pamela (E width) – Great for people with high insteps or swollen feet

Like most Homyped shoes, the Pamela sandal is fully adjustable and comes in a wide fit that’s suitable for broad feet. The adjustable straps make these shoes ideal for people with high insteps. The sandals are also great for people whose feet tend to swell throughout the day; as the Pamela is adjustable at multiple points, you can loosen it throughout the day to accommodate swelling. The sandals have rubber soles for excellent grip and stability, and a leather lining for a soft, breathable finish. And if you have gout or other forms of arthritis, the extra room allowed by the adjustable straps will help relieve pressure on the joints.

Rubie (C+ width) – Designed for diabetics and people always on their feet


The Rubie shoe is accredited by the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, thanks to its seamless design and special features that are perfect for those living with diabetes, as well as for any person who spends lots of time on their feet. Diabetes can damage nerves in the feet, which means people with the condition can lose feeling in their feet and aren’t aware their feet are being damaged by ill-fitting shoes until it’s too late.

To combat this, the Rubie shoe uses a surgical-grade Plastezote foam upper lining that conforms to the wearer’s foot to protect the skin and relieve pressure and rubbing. The shoes are lightweight but still provide plenty of stability and support to keep you sturdy and upright. The high-set toe box also means there’s no rubbing on the toes. As a bonus, Homyped added a padded bunion-relief panel to reduce pain and pressure.

Orthotic Inserts – Great for everyone

Most Homyped shoes (including all those listed on this page) are orthotic friendly. (Click here to browse the full range of orthotic friendly styles.) These have removable footbeds that can be replaced to address specific foot issues and needs.

These three orthotic inserts – regular, full and diabetic – can provide support and to realign the foot. Everyone’s natural strength and body alignment reduces with age, but the orthotic guides the foot back into its original position to help improve posture and add stability when standing or walking.

Homyped design – An all-round winner

Your feet may be sore and tired, even if you don’t have a foot condition – but the solution could be simple.

Three-quarters of people over the age of 65 wear shoes that are too small for them, putting pressure on the toes and cramping the foot into a space that doesn’t allow enough wriggle room.

To combat this issue, almost all Homyped shoes are fully adjustable, meaning you can mould them to fit your own feet and accommodate your individual needs. Browse the full range of styles online.

Do you have issues with your feet? Do you find it difficult to shop for shoes these days?

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