Drastic anti-terrorism measures at airports could make goodbyes even harder

Anyone who’s been to an airport will know that any member of the public can come into the check-in area,
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Anyone who’s been to an airport will know that any member of the public can come into the check-in area, they just aren’t allowed at the departure gates or in customs without a boarding pass. That could change under radical measures to stop terrorism in airports, however it would make goodbyes a lot harder.

One of the solaces of watching a loved one fly away is being able to spend some time at the airport with them before their flight leaves. You can grab a drink together or just simply be together as a family.

However recent attacks in the check-in area of the Brussels airport have meant more security measures need to be considered.

The topic was discussed at a global aviation convention on the Gold Coast, reports News Corp. Australia’s Office of Transport Security executive director Sachi Wimmer gave her thoughts on the topic: “While the aviation sector is growing and bringing tourism benefits, one thing unlikely to change is aviation will remain a terrorism target.”

“We are going to struggle to harden even further unless we go to saying only passengers can enter into airports which I can’t see anyone doing”, she said.

But conference speaker Will Thickett, the blast and security leader for ARUP, said it was an idea that shouldn’t be off limits.

“Depending on what happens with the threat, I don’t think we should shut our ears to any idea and we should be looking at the positives and negatives.”

“(But) all these different views of operation are things we should be looking at — and not have the blind view we have to do it the way we have always done it.”

Gold Coast Airport CEO Marion Charlton said “The passenger farewell and welcome is such an integral part of the airport experience and we are not in a hurry to change it at the Gold Coast”.

Tell us, would this upset you if goodbyes had to be done in the carpark? Or is it better to be safe than sorry?

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