Let’s talk: Should Easter have one fixed date? 48

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Aussie columnist Tim Dick believes that Easter should have one fixed date. He argues that using a religious calendar to calculate public holidays is “lunacy” – and today Starts At 60 wants your thoughts!

In The Age, Mr Dick points out that whilst we’re celebrating Easter in March this year, for orthodox churches the celebration won’t occur until May.

“The dates for our second-longest holiday break are imposed not by law nor by rational agreement”, Mr Dick argued this weekend.

“(Instead, Easter is determined) by the result of a weirdly convoluted and ancient calculation that’s part lunar, part religious, and all lunacy”.

Back in 325, a Christian council decreed when Easter should be celebrated. “The calculation now has little to do with modern life in which Easter is, for most, a civil public holiday”, Mr Dick argued.

Of course, many Australians can find planning around an ever-changing Easter break challenging. School terms, travel itineraries and even sporting games need to be planned around Easter Sunday.

When you consider that Christmas has a fixed date, even though nobody can prove when Jesus of Nazareth was born, celebrating Easter anywhere between March to April seems even more bizarre.

According to Mr Dick’s calculations, in 2038 Easter Sunday will fall on the same date as Anzac Day. How will Australians mark both occasions then?

“Easter should be fixed as the second Sunday in April”, Mr Dick believes. “No Anzac Day dawn service would compete with the Easter Bunny” this way, and public holidays would not be squeezed together.

Do you agree? Should Easter have a fixed date? When should Australians observe this holiday period?

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  1. Leave it as is. People have been able to schedule their time around the dates each year as they fall. If change is to occur, then it need to give us better than what we have now. I’m more worried that the powers to be will try & limit the ANZAC day celebrations with the excuse that it offends the Muslim population. A very poor reason.

  2. Leave it as is. People have been able to schedule their time around the dates each year as they fall. If change is to occur, then it need to give us better than what we have now. I’m more worried that the powers to be will try & limit the ANZAC day celebrations with the excuse that it offends the Muslim population. A very poor reason.

  3. Easter is the rising of Jesus after He was crucified on Good Friday.
    Easter Sunday is the Sunday following the paschal full moon date. The paschal full moon date is the ecclesiastical full moon date following 20 March. The Gregorian method derives paschal full moon dates by determining the epact for each year.
    If we have fixed dates it cannot ever be called Easter

    2 REPLY
    • Yes, you are correct using the first full Moon after Equinox. But it needs no to be. Our solar calendars are more precise, thta the liner or even theJulian and gregorian. Jesus was crucified on 14 Nisan in ad33 most probably. It is easy to work out what part of the solar calendar is closest. And the second week in April is pretty close. Easter ( or oestra) is our name for it. So what it’s called is not really relevant! It is good that we celebrate the death and resurrection of the Son of God.. Why should it bother the secularists? Except for a few days off! In anymore countries it is not a holiday. My daughter in the United states says it is very minor, as she worked a normal day on good Friday!

  4. It would be great to have it on the same date. All the seriously religious Christian folk may not agree, but the day is celebrated, that I would have thought, to be he most important factor!

    1 REPLY
    • Why is it necessary to have it on a fixed date.
      With all the apps available it’s easy to check the dates

  5. Leave it as it is. If anyone wants to debate the subject there is much more for leaving it as it is than changing to a set date. So much of our history and traditions are being watered down that we need to stand firm on this one.

    1 REPLY
    • Absolutely. Why are beliefs and traditions especially when the Christian religion is involved there has to be a change. No, No, leave it as it is and leave hundreds of years of beliefs and tradition alone.

  6. Make it the first Friday in April ….. Then making plans will be a lot easier !

    2 REPLY
    • Planning for what……..commemoration of the ultimate sacrifice Jesus made for us all including you and me.
      We know Good Friday will be on a Friday when He was crucified and Easter Sunday will be in 3 days time when He rose from the dead.
      All this follows the 40 days of Lent

  7. Leave it alone. Australia is a CHRISTIAN COUNTRY!!! If you want to change the system go back to where you came from!!!

    1 REPLY
    • I agree. You don’t have to believe in what Easter is all about so don’t take the holidays.

  8. The alternating dates of Easter are there for a reason, not for convenience. We know a year ahead when it is going to be so plans can be made. Notice this man’s surname?????

    1 REPLY
    • Spot on Marilyn. My first thought was how appropriate his name is.

      1 REPLY
      • Yes, ‘by name, & nature’, methinks!

        Totally agree with you both!

        1 REPLY
        • Why is every Tim, Dick and Nary with no Christian beliefs wanting to change an age-old Christian tradition?

          1 REPLY
  9. To me Easter revolves. Around the Easter bunny which is a very ancient tradition that celebrates the arrival of Spring much older than the Abraham religions .

  10. Duh! It’s a religious holiday hijacked by furry trash that delivers eggs! Lunacy, yes, because the date is based on the lunar calendar. The journalist obviously doesn’t believe letting research and facts get in the way of a good story.

  11. Wouldn’t it make good sense to have an ‘Autumn Holiday’, fixed in date to perhaps the first weekend in April, for those of us who don’t have strong religious beliefs, and the Christian believers can go on celebrating their important dates just as they do now, following the old rules. (Not sure how holidays would work out under this scheme, but as is said “If there’s a will, there’s a way”!)

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