Cauliflower and feta fritters 1



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When it comes to making a quick and easy dinner, it doesn’t get much better than this! All you have to do is steam the cauliflower, then throw it into a food processor with all the other ingredients. Pat them into little a firm patty shape then fry them up in a little olive oil. For a lovely light dinner, serve them up with a fresh salad, a squeeze of lemon juice and a dollop of Tzatziki or yoghurt. Yum!


  • 600g cauliflower florets
  • 100g Greek-style feta, crumbled
  • 1/4 cup fresh chives, finely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons fresh dill leaves
  • 3/4 cup fresh breadcrumbs
  • 1/3 cup plain flour
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Salad, to serve
  • Tzatziki, to serve
  • Lemon wedges, to serve


1. Preheat oven to 150C/130C fan-forced. Place cauliflower in a metal steamer over a saucepan of simmering water. Cover. Steam for 5 to 7 minutes or until tender.

2. Process cauliflower in a food processor until chopped. Transfer to a bowl. Add fetta, chives, thyme, breadcrumbs, flour and egg yolk. Season with salt and pepper. Using clean hands, mix until well combined. Working with damp hands, shape 1/4 cup of mixture into a firm patty. Place onto a baking paper-lined tray. Repeat with remaining mixture. Refrigerate for 30 minutes or until firm (see note).

3. Heat oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Cook fritters, in batches, for 2 minutes each side or until golden and heated through. Transfer to a wire rack over a baking tray. Place in oven to keep warm while cooking remaining fritters.

4. Serve fritters with salad, tzatziki and lemon wedges.


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  1. Wondering why you use only the egg yolk? I was always taught in the good old days of school domestic science lessons, that it was the protein in the egg white which binds ingredients together. I would use the whole egg if making this recipe.

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