Why write in retirement? 2



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The major reason is because you know more now. You’ve lived a long time, read a lot, discussed and argued your beliefs and opinions, which have grown and changed over the years. Mine certainly have. I am probably more tolerant now. Many topics, on which I used to have very fixed opinions, I‘m now less sure about. Have your sentiments and attitudes changed since you were a 20 year old? They haven’t—then don’t write—just play more golf.

Writing makes it easier to share your current thoughts with others. When I write what I feel, the writing process clarifies my point of view and gives me confidence to share it with others. If it’s not clear enough I change it again and again—as I am doing now with this article.

Knowing that someone, other than your sympathetic wife or caring family, has honestly enjoyed your writing is the greatest reward for all writers. Praise from outside the family does not come often. Well not for me. Ideally it comes from a complete stranger who knows you only through your writing. They have read you article or your book and have taken some trouble to contact you perhaps by email. This is the sweetest praise of all and I think to myself—fantastic, I must write more.

Seeing your words in a publication is also very rewarding. This doesn’t have to be in a book. In a book is great, but you might write on a website like this or in a letter to a newspaper or in an article for a magazine perhaps. If someone has appreciated your writing so much, that they have published it, this is very satisfying.

Knowing that the more you produce the better writer you become is a very good reason to keep at it. Your writing always improves. I have gone from the worst essay writer in school to a distinctly improved writer today, in only 60 years. And I’m still working on it.

And lastly, you always have a project on the go. You are always in what I believe, is the enviable position, of not having enough time to write all the things you want to write about. You’re never left wondering what should I do now? It’s always—what should I choose for my next project?

Write in your retirement.

Tell us, do you like to write? If you do, you can write for us! We offer bloggers a $20 voucher for the best blog every day and have a growing community that’s personally managed. What are you waiting for?

Brian Robertson

Brian Robertson hails from Scotland originally and arrived in Australia with family via PNG in 1986. Ex–farmer (Scotland), ex–soldier (Gordon Highlanders in Cyprus) ex–science teacher (Scotland and PNG), ex–curriculum developer (Scotland, PNG, Southern Africa, Solomon Islands and Australia), he is also a husband, father and grandfather. He is now retired, writing and loving every minute. He is interested in reading, people, politics, and agriculture but above all he lives to write, for as long as possible.

  1. I’ve written two books and on my third since retiring. The first book Angel with Drumsticks is my husbands story when his band played in the first rock mass in Rome in 1966. It is a story that gave him a lot of pain and I think by telling the full story has given him some piece. The second book For the love of a Dingo is just part of the life of a very special lady, Berenice Walters, known as the Dingo Lady. The book I ma writing is her full biography. I have also recorded my father’s story for my son and future grandchildren and also putting down my own story for them.

    I have also started 4 blogs. ne of them is for the books I review

    1 REPLY
    • Yes I have looked at your site, Pam’s Nook. It’s great. I don’t know how you have the time to write and review also. I also have a few sites I am trying to amalgamate into one.
      Good luck with the writing and selling.
      Cheers Brian

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