Survey confirms how Aldi’s prices really compare to other supermarkets 11

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New survey reveals the truth about Aldi prices.

Have you really been saving money by shopping at Aldi? A new supermarket survey by FairFax has revealed how Aldi’s prices compare to Woolworths and Coles when it comes to branded products. The survey shows that shoppers are paying an extra 12 per cent for branded products such as Coke, Tim Tams and Weet-Bix and Coles shoppers are paying an extra 14 per cent for the same products compared with German discounter Aldi. The survey which was conducted at Aldi, Woolworths and Coles supermarkets in one suburb found that Aldi sold 125 branded products while just 36 were sold in the same size at Woolworths and Coles supermarkets nearby.

The list of 36 products includes brands such as chocolate makers Nestle and Mars, lolly brand Allens, Heinz and Johnson & Johnson. Some of the 36 common products were cheaper at Woolworths and Coles if shoppers bought more than one. 

Have you been saving money by shopping at Aldi?

Here’s what the survey has revealed:

  • If a shopper bought all 36 items from Aldi, they would pay $113.25.
  • If they bought all 36 items from Woolworths, they would pay $126.67 – $13.24 more than Aldi.
  • If they bought all 36 items from Coles, they would pay $129.50 – $16.25  more than Aldi.

On the Devondale long life full cream milk, Coles and Aldi were roughly in line but Woolworths was 42 per cent more expensive. Of the 125 branded products sold by Aldi, some were not available at Woolworths or Coles, such as Heinz Nurture baby formula, Birds Eye Curly Fries and Wizz Fizz party packs.

Products compared by weight

Some products could not be compared apple-to-apple so weight was used to determine how they match up:

  • Gillette Mach 3 replacement cartridges were similar in price at the three supermarkets, at $3.30 each.
  • Arnotts BBQ shapes cheaper at Aldi at $1.20 per 100 grams versus $1.71 for Woolworths and Coles.
  • Vegemite was cheapest per weight at Coles, at $1.25 per 100 grams, compared with $1.54 for Aldi and $1.58 for Woolworths.
  • Betadine sore throat lozenges cheapest at Aldi at 17¢ each, compared with 28¢ each at Woolworths and Coles.

Where do you shop?

Starts at 60 Writers

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  1. Aldi comes out tops all the time, they save me at least $100 on my fortnightly grocery bill. I won’t shop anywhere else unless I HAVE to! Have you heard anyone saying :I love Coles”or “i love Woolworths”. Not!
    Heaps of ppl “Love” Aldi😆

    1 REPLY
    • Aldis in Ciceri, NY……. WENT TO PURCHASE A BUTTERBALL TURKEY, RANG UP 1.2I9 PER LB. ON SALE PER AD FOR .99 LB. CASHIER AND PWRSON IN CHARFE WOULD NOT ADJUST PRICE. FALSE ADVERTISING TO THE FULLEST!!!!!!!!!!

  2. Coles and Woolworth are Australian companies owned by Australian with a wide range of products. Coles and Woolworth are also paying taxes in Australia. I someone has a good look the prices and the overall quality of products is better than Aldi. Aldi is also ripping off people by charging them to use a credit card. No, I prefer that my hard earned money stays in Australia instead of making the Albrecht family in Germany richer.

    2 REPLY
    • If you think Coles and Woolworths aren’t exploiting tax loopholes like every other large business you are very naive. Woolworths ethics with local suppliers are also being put under the spotlight on what appears to be a gross abuse of their size and power. The bully tactics underpinning Woolworths and their ever increasing need for shareholder returns makes me think twice about shopping there.

    • Where DO you get the idea that Aldi don’t pay taxes here? There was a financial report on TV recently, not particularly involved with Aldi, but the name did come up, and they pay millions in tax here! Also, the vast majority of goods they sell are produced right here in Australia.

  3. I regularly shop at ALDI and I always save money there in comparison to Woolworths and Coles. I have done systematic cost analyses and I have found that I save between A$21 and A$25 a week by shopping at ALDI and not at the two major competitors. Groceries at Woolworths and Coles cost, on average, some 30% more than at ALDI. I am a semi-retired researcher and I maximize my limited income by shopping where my money buys more for less – at ALDI! No contest!

  4. Also wins . Coles and Woolworths screw their suppliers and their customers and have become arrogant and fat . Also has broken the Oligopoly.

  5. If you have flybuys at Coles you need to factor in the rewards.

    We recently spent $80 per week for 4 weeks and got a credit of $75 which is almost 25% discount on already discounted/special prices that I stocked up on.

    Plus I make sure I take advantage of double or triple point offers and get $10 credit every few weeks.

    I do like Aldi for a lot of things, though – e.g. 9 grain bread in Coles $3.50, in Aldi $1.89.

  6. For me, shopping at Woolies’ is advantageous.
    Next in line, Coles, now they’ve partnered with Virgin Airlines.

    Aldi, never have, never will.
    Just plain don’t like them at all, in any way.
    That is MY choice!

  7. I agree that shopping at Aldi does make some sense, BUT their product range and choices are far less than Woolies and Coles. In addition, when I weigh up the fact that I’ve received
    $130 in cash rewards from Woolies over the past 10 weeks then there is really no contest.
    Add to this the 4c litre petrol discount and the weekly half-price sale items which enable you
    to stock up on costly essentials like coffee, etc. Woolies really are a boon to pensioners.
    I do wish Aldi success though as their competitiveness will ensure Coles and Woolies
    are kept honest.

    1 REPLY
    • Agreed. A diabetic, many lines required not stocked at Aldi stores. My preference is for the major supermarkets, with their better layouts, and wider range. However, should something in the non-grocery section be desired, I’d visit an Aldi store.

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