Philip Ruddock retires but it’s his new job everyone is talking about

It was announced this afternoon that Philip Ruddock, the father of the House of Representatives and former minister during the John
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It was announced this afternoon that Philip Ruddock, the father of the House of Representatives and former minister during the John Howard’s administration, will retire from politics at the next election after 42 years.

Ruddock, along with Bronwyn Bishop and other older politicians, have felt the pressure in recent months to step aside and let fresh young blood into parliament, but it’s not this issue that has people talking – it’s Ruddock’s new job.

Julie Bishop announced today that Ruddock will become Australia’s Special Envoy for Human Rights.

Australia’s longest serving politician said, “Having been an executive member of the inaugural Parliamentary Amnesty Group some 40 years ago, that has driven my deep personal interest in these issues and has allowed me to develop a network of those dedicated to the advancement of human rights internationally. That passion remains unabated,” reports The Australian.

“I believe the role of Special Envoy for Human Rights complements my long term engagement in these areas and aligns with my ardently held beliefs that Australia has a strong ability to advance human rights on a global scale.”

Ruddock was immigration minister in 2001 during the Tampa crisis when Howard refused to accept 438 asylum seekers on board the Norwegian freighter the MV Tampa, and drafted the new laws that made it possible for the asylum seekers to be taken to Nauru. This “Pacific Solution” was the beginnings of Australia’s off-shore processing policy.

The announcement has been met with shock and anger in some cases, as people question Ruddock’s humanitarian qualifications. BuzzFeed reports that Amnesty International requested he stop wearing their pin on his lapel in 2000.

In his new role, Ruddock will campaign for Australia to become part of the Human Rights Council, and promote Australia’s human rights record, reports the Guardian.

“As special envoy, Mr Ruddock will focus on advancing Australia’s human rights priorities of good governance, freedom of expression, gender equality, the rights of Indigenous peoples, and national human rights institutions,”said Julie Bishop in a statement. “Mr Ruddock is well-qualified to advocate and represent Australia’s human rights views and record.”

Others disagree:

What do you think of this new posting for Philip Ruddock? Does he have your support?

 

  1. Elda Mulrine Quinton

    Why can’t these old farts just stand aside and let the younger ones gain the experience? You find the same thing in sporting bodies. All the old farts hang on to their positions of power instead of teaching the younger ones who are coming through the ranks.

  2. Elda Mulrine Quinton

    Why can’t these old farts just stand aside and let the younger ones gain the experience? You find the same thing in sporting bodies. All the old farts hang on to their positions of power instead of teaching the younger ones who are coming through the ranks.

  3. Elda Mulrine Quinton

    Why can’t these old farts just stand aside and let the younger ones gain the experience? You find the same thing in sporting bodies. All the old farts hang on to their positions of power instead of teaching the younger ones who are coming through the ranks.

    • Joan Rowe

      Because they are setting US old farts an example. we should all be out there pounding the pavements looking for a job. Remember? They can’t afford us even though we paid taxes all our working lives which did include a pension.

    • Lorraine Moss

      Sometimes younger ones aren’t interested either happy for the “old farts” to keep on doing what they do but not happy to contribute or to whinge and bitch

    • Gary Hinton

      Because the younger ones don’t have a clue, great examples in Shorten and Conroy

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