Life hack: How to clean your ceiling fans in seconds 98



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Cleaning ceiling fans is one of the most annoying household tasks – they’re hard to get to, spin out of reach at the slightest touch, and the dust goes everywhere as soon as you try to wipe them down. We’ve found a fuss-free, why-didn’t-I-think-of-that solution to this age old drama.

The secret weapon? A pillowcase!

Simply place a pillowcase over a fan blade and then slide it off, holding the blade to wipe it down. Not only will you clean the dust from the fan, but the fluff will remain inside the pillowcase. Once you have cleaned all of the blades, take the pillowcase outside and turn inside out, shaking the dust out or into a bin! When your fans are squeaky clean, throw the pillowcase into the wash and you’re done!

Friendly reminder!

Don’t forget to switch your fan from its ‘summer’ setting, to the ‘winter’ one! This handy little switch changes the direction of blade rotation and pushes hot air down, instead of lifting it up – helping to warm your home during the chillier months.

Originally published here

Starts at 60 Writers

The Starts at 60 writers team seek out interesting topics and write them especially for you.

  1. LOL…set it to summer setting, not winter setting…but who uses their ceiling fans in winter? 🌸

    5 REPLY
  2. People with high ceilings reverse their fans in winter to force down the hot air which has gone straight up to the ceilings.

    5 REPLY
    • That’s if the ceiling’s not so high that you can’t reach the little switch on the side of the fan!! Plus we’ve never worked out which is forward and which is reverse….

    • Me neither Dianne but I understand the theory. Just checked my bedroom fan and if we are right down is for summer.

    • Reverse our fans in winter (have high ceilings) and with the coonara going its lovely and warm much warmer than the ducted heating.

    • both fan ‘directions’ push air down – the difference is that the normal ‘summer/cooling’ mode pushes it straight down from the fan blades (if you don’t know – watch which way the fan starts to move – the trailing edge of the fan – up or down ? – is the direction the air will be pushed) and is more likely to cause a breeze/cooling effect on your skin.

      the ‘winter/heating’ mode pushes air up – where it is intended to move across the ceiling and down the walls of the room – less likely to cause a breeze which would feel ‘cold’ on the skin when you don’t want it – and warm air that would otherwise naturally rise and sit at the ceiling gets hopefully pushed down – you still probably only want the ceiling fan on low speed – otherwise you might trigger the undesirable ‘cooling’ effect on the skin you don’t want in winter.

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