Help! I have osteopenia… 58

Our Community Cares


View Profile

Patti has just been diagnosed with osteopenia… Can you give her any advice?

Hi. I just found out have osteopenia. Any links or peoples’ personal experiences with it?

Share your advice below.

Starts at 60 Writers

The Starts at 60 writers team seek out interesting topics and write them especially for you.

  1. Don’t know what it is ?

    3 REPLY
    • Osteopenia was defined in June 1992 by the World Health Organization. A group of experts decided that condition would mean a bone density that was one standard deviation below that of an average 30-year-old white woman. The group also defined osteoporosis as bone density 2.5 standard deviations or more below that 30-year-old; previously it had been used only in cases where elderly patients had fractured or broken a bone. An osteoporosis epidemiologist at the Mayo Clinic who participated in setting the criteria in 1992 said “It was just meant to indicate the emergence of a problem,” and noted that “It didn’t have any particular diagnostic or therapeutic significance. It was just meant to show a huge group who looked like they might be at risk.”

      The definition has been controversial. Steven R. Cummings, of the University of California, San Francisco, said in 2003 that “There is no basis, no biological, social, economic or treatment basis, no basis whatsoever” for using one standard deviation. Cummings added that “As a consequence, though, more than half of the population is told arbitrarily that they have a condition they need to worry about.”

  2. I don’t have this condition or osteoporosis but I take daily Caltrate Bone & Muscle tablets because I know I don’t have enough calcium in my diet. The Caltrate not only gives you a calcium supplement but also vitamin D3 to assist with absorption and there’s other trace elements as well to assist with bone strength and flexibility. I’ve been taking them for years.

  3. I was diagnosed with Osteopenia several years ago. One Dr. Told me to take 2 Caltrate tablets (with Vit. D) every day. Another told me last year my Calcium was too high, only take one every second day! I find if my back hurts, I have also had Compression Fractures in my back, I don’t know how they happen, I rest for as long as I can. Some things aren’t much fun when we get older. 👵🏼💊🛌

    2 REPLY
  4. Check with your local gym for a weights program… bone density has increased with doing weights. There is also a specialised Pilates program you can do to increase bone density..look into that

    1 REPLY
    • Good recommendation, Donna Johnston. Many people, and doctors too, overlook the importance of weight-bearing exercise to increase or maintain bone density.

  5. I take vitamin d. Have been told to walk or swim and to do gentle Pilates or yoga. I hate exercise, but need to start as I’m only 57 and have a bit of living to do yet 🙂

  6. I take a tablet once a week called fosomax. Also can be an injection every six months, taking caltrate useless. Carol Pickworth

    4 REPLY
    • Hi Robert. I had the injection for the 1st time on September 3rd. I woke about 11.45 shaking with the cold and couldn’t breathe properly. Luckily I live in Granny flat at my daughters and she rang ambulance. I had high heart rate, pulse, and temperature and low oxygen levels. can’t contribute it to anything else so won’t be having another. I had Breast cancer last year and have to take hormone tablets for 5 years and oncologist thought the intravenous dose twice a year would be good. As my birthday is 4/9 spent it in hospital.

    • There have been studies done on these Carol and Judy. They cause jaw bone damage (some dentists wont touch your teeth if you are taking this medication), bone fractures, esphogeal cancer and others related to these medications. They evidently crumble bones. Google effects.

      1 REPLY
      • Most doctors now refute this. It was an American study from a couple of years ago, done by the dentist association/ My specialist said it is not true. I asked my dentist what he thought, and he said they were told that, but his proper research told him otherwise. I know people, including my sister, who have been having this injection for 4 years now, and their bone density has improved, and their teeth, and bones in the jaws are fine.

    • Fosomax has serious, I mean really serious consequences. For some reason, not yet fully understood, some small number of people experience serious dental problems with fosomax. When a tooth has been removed some people on fosomax cannot regrow the gum over the space left by the extraction. The gum and bone just stay open to infection and the patient ends up with a never ending rotting socket. This cannot be cured and there are no indications that it may happen to you. Most GPs have very little knowledge of dentistry and oral health, this reaction to fosomax has been discovered by dentists and as the incident is small it has taken a long time for the health professionals to know that this can happen. They have no knowledge if this reaction to extraction is triggered by one dose or by long term use.
      Stop taking fosomax and make sure your oral hygiene is immaculate.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *