Can asking questions change your life after 60? 15



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When you ask a question, are you looking for an answer? Most of us have been taught in school and throughout our lives that you have to get the right answer. What if there is a different way of looking at it?

A question opens the door to awareness and possibility. A question empowers. An answer disempowers. When you think you have the right answer, do you keep asking questions? Or do you stop? If you learn from an “expert” that there are three reasons for climate change, do you assume that there’s no point in looking for anything else?

If a doctor diagnoses you with a fatal disease, what do you do? Do you assume the doctor has the right answer? Do you get a second opinion? Or do you start seeking completely different alternatives?

How many answers have you been using to create the limitations of your life? What if there is a different possibility available?

By asking questions, we open the door to more awareness and possibilities in every situation. Whenever something comes up in life that you’re not sure how to handle, you can ask these four questions:

  1. What is this?
  2. What do I do with it?
  3. Can it change?
  4. If so, how do I change it?

For example, at one point I was aware that I didn’t have as much money in my accounts as I should have had. I used these four questions, and I became aware that something was “off” with my credit card company. When one of my assistants checked, we found that they were holding thousands of dollars of my money because we hadn’t signed a form that they had not told us about. By asking these questions, instead of making it a problem, I got the awareness of what was going on and how we could handle it with ease.

These four questions can be applied to almost anything: body symptoms, technological glitches, “moods” or feelings, and even relationships.

If you’re not feeling well, ask: “Who does this belong to?” It may sound crazy, but most of us are very psychic. I’m not talking about reading tea leaves or crystal balls. I’m talking about picking up the thoughts, feelings, emotions, and even physical ailments of those around us. Have you ever walked into a room where someone was angry and noticed that you were suddenly irritated? Have you ever had a sudden pain “out of nowhere” – and then it disappeared just as quickly? Have you ever been walking down the street in a great mood and suddenly you felt sad for no reason? Could you explain it? Did you start looking for reasons in your life to justify why you would feel sad? If you assume that those feelings are yours and you have to do something about them, in so doing, you lock them into your body and your reality. If you ask: “Who does this belong to?” – you are not looking for a specific answer. If things seem to lighten up, it’s not yours. You can return it to sender. Sound too easy? You wouldn’t want your life to be easy. Or would you?

What if you could invite wonderful, unexpected things to come into your life – just by asking? When things are not going well, ask: “How does it get any better than this?” You can even ask this question when things are going well. If you assume that “it can’t get any better than this,” how much do you cut yourself off from what else might be available to you that’s even greater?


When things aren’t working out the way you’d like, you can also ask: “What’s right about this I’m not getting?” This question can help you to gain a broader perspective. As a result, you may find a different way to handle the situation or become aware of something you had missed. What if it could lead you to a possibility you hadn’t considered?


By beginning to ask these questions, you may start to find that things show up in your life in strange and magical ways. If you start asking these questions in every moment of your life, you begin to live as the question.


What question are you not asking that would change everything? Tell us below.

Gary Douglas

Gary Douglas is a speaker, prolific author and the Founder of Access Consciousness® ; a set of personal transformation tools, currently taught in 47 countries. A vibrant 70-year-old grandfather, Gary works twelve-hour days, rides spirited stallions for a hobby and openly proclaims that for him, “life is just beginning”. and

  1. I have always , even as a very young child asked questions about everything, you can never learn anything unless you ask how where and why

  2. A Doctor once told me that I asked questions to which I would really be better off not knowing the answers! Eg…about side effects of drugs, potential risks of treatment..etc…I thought I
    DID want to know! I like that the writer of this article seems very positive! but life begins at 70? I don’t think so,,,,

  3. Pingback: Question 3 |

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