A musical diary: February 1966 28



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All roads were leading to Melbourne where the Australian music scene had exploded, there were two national TV shows geared to the young music scene. The Go Show and KOMMOTION had the teenagers in front of their TVs five nights a week. The bands were arriving in Melbourne from all over Australia: The Twilights and The Masters Apprentices from Adelaide; The Purple Hearts from Brisbane. Now look here! Something just had to be done and finally something has been.

“GO-SET is going, going for you and everything you want. Going all out to capture the imagination of the movers”. This was the editorial for the very first GO-SET magazine issued on the 2nd of February 1966. The magazine was started by Monash University students Phillip Frazer and Tony Schauble. For only 15 cents the magazine, which claimed to be the only music paper for the teens and 20-year-olds, got all the news and gossip from around Australia and the world.

The first issue had a cover story about Tom Jones; the article titled “The wailing Welshman talks to Go-Set”. There was an article about Pat Carroll who was entertaining the troops in Vietnam and a surfing report by Tony Olsson, Victoria’s leading surf expert. The main feature regarding local talent was about The Groop, a Melbourne band which was touring with Tom Jones and Hermans Hermits. Prue Acton had her own article featuring the fashion trend for the young and the first top 40 charts in Australia sponsored by Melbourne’s 3UZ radio station.

They had The Seekers at #1 with “The Carnival is Over”, at #2 was The Beatles, “Daytripper/We Can Work It Out” and #3 “Tell Him I’m Not Home” by Normie Rowe. Swinging DJ Kenny Sparkes also had an article called “From Ken With Love” which promised titillating morsels of miscellaneous gossip.

Pat Carroll was a Melbournian, born in 1946. She was a talented child who had lots of TV appearances in children programmes. As a teenager she appeared in Brian Henderson’s Bandstand and Go-Set and in 1964 covered The Crystals’ “He’s a Rebel” which was a very minor hit in Australia. She then teamed up with her friend Olivia Newton John and won a talent contest in Melbourne which led to a trip to England. They had some success as Pat & Olivia on TV and clubs but when their visas expired, Pat decided to return to Australia. Olivia stayed on and launched her own international career. In Australia Pat returned to the recording studio with only minor successes.

In Birmingham, The Move was formed. The group, headed by Roy Wood, were very successful in the UK over the next few years with hits such as “Night of Fear” “Fire Brigade” and “Blackberry Way”. In 1967 their hit “Flowers in the Rain” earned the distinction of being the first ever record played on the UK’s national pop-only radio station, Radio 1. Roy Wood then went on to form The Electric Light Orchestra and then Wizzard. Following considerable record and TV success in the USA which was unmatched in the UK, Chad Stuart and Jeremy Clyde decided to make the radical step of applying for US citizenship.

Young rising star in the UK, David Jones changed his name to David Bowie so he would not get mixed up with Davy Jones of The Monkees.

Born this month on the 6th was Rick Astley, British singer in the 1980s. Sadly on the 9th music legend Sophie Tucker passed away at the age of 81.

“Daytripper”/“We Can Work it Out” by The Beatles was #1 for the whole month in Oz.

In the USA, on the 5th and 12th , the #1 was “My Love” by Petula Clark. On the 9th it was “Lightning Strikes by Lou Christie and on the 26th, “These Boots Were Made For Walking” by Nancy Sinatra.

In the UK, on the 5th and 12th, “Michelle” by The Overlanders was number one, and like the US, “These Boots Were Made For Walking” by Nancy Sinatra was number one on the 19th and 26th.


The top ten in the UK in February 1966

  1. Michelle – The Overlanders
  2. 19th Nervous Breakdown – The Rolling Stones
  3. I Can’t Let Go – The Hollies
  4. Sha La La La Lee – The Small Faces
  5. Barbara Ann – The Beach Boys
  6. My Love – Petula Clark
  7. Backstage – Gene Pitney
  8. Make the World Go Away – Eddy Arnold
  9. Keep on Running – The Spencer Davis Group
  10. A Groovy Kind of Love – The Mindbenders

Benjamin Hill

I was born in Belfast Northern Ireland 1946, I attended school at Ballygomartin Secondary School until I began an apprenticeship as an Electrician in 1962 at Harland and Wolff Shipbuilders (Birthplace of the Titanic). I married Rose-Marie in 1964 and immigrated to Australia in 1970 together with our two children Anna-Marie and Ronald. I worked in various sections of the construction industry as an Electrician until retirement 2011 and now my blog about 60s music is a labour of love that I am lucky to share with all lovers of music.

  1. What a lovely musical time capsule! So wish I’d spent my youth here. Loved the Seekers and the Carnival is Over,and These Boots were Meant For Walking coincided with my first pair of knee high white leather boots and I thought I was the Bees Knees!

  2. Lovely memories Benjamin. I was so lucky to have married my own Purple Heart – Mick Hadley and went down the aisle to him singing “Wild Thing you make my heart sing.” A beautiful man – I still hear him singing and am thrilled that his gig at his last blues festival is being remixed and will be played on radio soon.

  3. significant day in the world of music, today is “the day the music died”, Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and The Big Bopper died in that light plane crash at Clear Lake , Iowa, 57 years ago.

  4. Loved Buddy Holly & all 50,s 60,s music.Danced the night away often in my teens.Good article.

  5. Well done Benjamin! I was born in 1947 aand know each and every one of mentioned songs and love them all still. ‘Those were the days’ of music!

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