Why you should find purpose in your life after retiring 47



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Those who succeed in retirement are those who obviously know what they are retiring from, but more importantly know that what they are retiring to. Have a clear picture of what retirement looks like for you, how you will engage your skills and resources and how you will stay challenged.

For many robust retirees, retirement is an artificial finish line that they will never cross.

Financial considerations are one part of retirement planning. However moving from full time employment to a new life in retirement is a significant life transition for most of us. Sadly few of us are prepared for the emotional upheaval that follows. Making the transition from full time employment in a busy career to a new life in retirement can be quite an emotional and stressful experience.

For many of us, our career of choice is a significant focus in our lives. We spend a great deal of time at work, and we form meaningful professional and personal relationships along the way and often develop new friendships with people we may otherwise not have met. There’s also the daily interaction with colleagues and associates as well as the camaraderie that follows from working on shared projects and team goals.

It’s not uncommon to feel a sense of loss or grief when these personal and professional connections are removed from your social experience. For this reason, I often advise clients who are contemplating retirement to consider reducing their hours of employment rather than leaving work completely. This can also help with the transition to retirement financially, as well as in terms of lifestyle.

Rather than leaving your job permanently, perhaps approach your employer to see whether you can reduce your hours by one or two days a week. This allows you to explore new hobbies and activities outside of the working environment while still receiving a source of income. Being open with your employer regarding your plans also helps your employer to plan ahead for the day when you finally decide to relinquish your role altogether.

Retirement isn’t always about building the largest pot of money, it is about reaping the benefits of decades of hard work and planning for the lifestyle you imagine in the years ahead. For this reason, I encourage you to consider, when you’re thinking about retiring, make sure that you are retiring to something rather than simply from something.

Authorised Representative (ASIC No.263557). The Retirement Advice Centre is a Corporate Authorised Representative of Millennium3 Financial Services Pty Ltd ABN 61 094 529 987. Australian Financial Services Licensee Number 244252. Unit 7, 50 Borthwick Avenue Murarrie Qld 4172

The information contained in this document is general in nature and may not be relevant to your individual circumstances. You should refrain from doing anything in reliance on this information without first obtaining suitable professional advice. The views expressed in this publication are solely those of the author; they are not reflective or indicative of Millennium3 Financial Service’s position, and are not to be attributed to Millennium3. They cannot be reproduced in any form without the express written consent of the author.

David Reed

David Reed is a certified Retirement Coach and national award winning Retirement Adviser. He has a passion for the science of retirement that has enabled him to successfully guide clients to their ideal retirement since 2003. David has authored two books on retirement psychology and modern retirement planning techniques. www.smartretirement.com.au

  1. I am loving life, lots of fulfilling activities, friends, volunteering. In Adelaide with fringe, cheap shows, free writers week, what is not to love about having the time to do these things.

  2. So don’t retire ! Reduce hours omg people do deserve the right to retire to slow down to be selfish .. Do what you want to do as nicely put by Ann Burgess i too have recently retired & i am loving the freedom that i earnt after working 46 yrs

  3. Not selfish, just the natural life progression.. This is why we do our busy years, and look forward to our bookclubs, hobbies, just TIME to spend as we CHOOSE.. LOVE IT <3

  4. Retirement is our reward for many years spent in the work force , for most of us. I was glad to finish work, I was tired, and ready to move onto the next phase of live. For me I enjoy the simple life, doing simple things like pottering around my home and garden, and waliking the dogs. I enjoy not having to get up for work, and feeling stressed. We dont have a lot of money to go on world trips, but thats ok because I am happiest at home in my own home that we own, with the things I treasure around me, I am grateful for that on a daily basis. Retirement is wonderful.

    5 REPLY
    • Linda like you I don’t want to go off travelling ,did that when younger , get great pleasure ,from my home and garden. Enjoy less stress and happy with what I’ve got , 💐

    • Linda I am with you – my husband and I worked in Sydney 100kms from where we live so we had an 8 hour day plus 5 hours of travelling – now we walk downstairs and so enjoy our lives. We’re lucky than a lot that we live near the sea in a lovely area which also makes waking up a joy – we love life now

  5. I am sort of semi retired. I have no private super and I am not yet old enough for the aged pension. I find if I focus on all that though I get depressed. I am learning to focus on the privilige of having time to do things which will leave my small part of the world in a better state.

  6. I’ve never been happier or busier. Also because I am more at ease and less stressed than when I worked have more friends than I ever did when I worked. But in general for those who love their jobs I agree with this article.

  7. On the contrary – I have finally found the time to engage in those activities that interest me most – and am loving pretty well every minute of it – even if poverty means that at least some of my excitement comes from tracking down bargains, spotting that great ‘thingy’ at the tip and other such bucolic adventures.

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