We would have never done that in our day!

The 50s and 60s were a great time, but they were also quite a strict time. How many times did you see your mother or father tut-tut when they saw someone doing something that wasn’t considered proper etiquette? Probably a lot. You didn’t want to be one of the commoners! Now, with our technological era and the lack of communication that comes with it, it also feels as if our manners have gone out the window.

Rudeness is not something you encounter every now and then – you’re now living in a rude world and it’s a rude wake up call!

Here is what was in poor taste many years ago, but is just part and parcel nowadays.

 

Interrupting someone when they are talking to you or someone else

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Being interrupted can be quite upsetting, not to mention annoying. There’s nothing worse than being in the middle of a story and another person pipes up with their two cents. Our mothers would have smacked us for talking over the top of someone but now, no one can wait their turn.

Tattoos

In the 50s and 60s, tattoos were reserved for the lower class. You were either a biker, sailor or in the army and there weren’t really any exceptions. These days, millions of people have one or more tattoos, in every class of society.

Eating food with hands

Table manners were always a sign of good breeding but they are as rare as hen’s teeth today. No one places their knife and fork together on the plate, and many people choose to eat with their fingers in place of cutlery. We are shaking our heads!

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Contacting someone or making noise after 9pm

If we wanted to speak to someone, it needed to be between 8am and 9pm. Call outside these times and you were being inexplicably rude! But today, we think nothing of writing a text, playing music or calling someone after 9pm.

Asking a man on a date

A man would always ask a lady to date him, and not the other way around. If a girl liked a boy, he would have to do the wooing, but now (thankfully) both men and women ask each other to go for a drink.

Exposed midriff or wearing a skirt above the knee

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Everywhere you go, you’re bound to see either a girl with an exposed stomach or a mini skirt, or worse: both. Growing up, we would have gotten the cane for walking outside the house half-dressed but it is a lot less scandalous in 2015. Many women in the public domain feel comfortable wearing short shorts, mini skirts and crop tops.

Being late or cancelling plans at the last minute

A respectable man or woman would never arrive late to a meeting or engagement 50 years ago, but now our rudeness has reached astronomical levels. We think nothing of inconveniencing people daily because, well, they do it to us! Pencilling someone into your diary is never a permanent booking.

Women swearing

If our mothers heard us swearing when we were children, we’d never see the light of day again. Much the same if we were a young lady – it was unacceptable and common to be heard swearing in polite company. Today, foul words are flung around like no one’s business!

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Wearing hats indoors

The epitome of rudeness used to be (and up until about 20 years ago) wearing your hat inside. School teachers, priests and even movie theatre ushers would politely ask you to remove your hat. Now, we see celebrities and everyday people alike wearing caps, hats and fascinators indoors without so much as a thought.

Forgetting to pay attention to the person you’re with

Our smart phones have changed our lives and how we interact, and one of the rudest things we can do even today is pick up the phone and scroll through Facebook when we are out at lunch or even talking one-on-one with someone. It makes you wonder how we could hole our attention without phones back in the day? It’s blatant rudeness!

 

What other bad behaviours do you see that use to be incredibly rude when you were growing up? Do you consider them rude or in poor taste now? Or have you loosened up your expectations? Tell us below.