Clever ways to make your own ice packs…

Every now and then you may find yourself in a situation that requires an ice pack. Whether you need it
Lifestyle

Every now and then you may find yourself in a situation that requires an ice pack. Whether you need it for a sprain, muscle aches, stings or just need something to keep your lunch cold, having an ice pack on hand is always a good idea.

Instead of spending money on store bought packs which may include harsh chemicals, we have found 5 easy ways to make your own icepack at home, using common household ingredients.

  • Dishwashing liquid

Using dishwashing liquid also gives a gel consistency however after day one it becomes much more icy and firm. Using a bright coloured dish soap will help indicate that this substance is not edible. All you will need is dishwashing soap and a bag.

  1. Pour dishwashing soap into a ziplock bag (size of your choice)
  2. Seal and freeze for several hours or overnight for best results
  3. *Try to get as much air out of the bag as you can before you seal the bag.
  • Glucose syrup 

Icepacks made with glucose corn syrup ensures a nice gel consistence so it stays flexible and squishy. All you will need is corn syrup and a ziplock bag.

  1. Pour corn syrup into the bag
  2. Freeze for several hours or overnight for best results
  3. *Try to get as much air out of the bag as you can before you seal the bag
  4. Optional: You can add some food colouring to the syrup if you want to ensure people know it’s not for consuming!
  • Rubbing alcohol

Rubbing alcohol (i.e. Isocol) is another great ingredient for icepacks. As alcohol does not freeze, it will also be a great gel consistency that will mould to your body or wherever you need to apply it well. You will need a sandwich sized ziplock bag, rubbing alcohol and water.

  1. Combine 1 1/2 cups of water with 1/2 cup of rubbing alcohol
  2. Pour the mixture into a standard sandwich sized ziplock bag
  3. Seal the bag and freeze for several hour
  4. *Try to get as much air out of the bag as you can before you seal the bag
  5. Optional: You can add some food colouring to the syrup if you want to ensure people know it’s not for consuming!
  • Salt

Ordinary table salt also works well and won’t be harmful if the bag accidentally breaks. For this you will need table salt and a sandwich sized ziplock bag.

  1. Add 2 tablespoons of salt and 2 cups of water together
  2. Pour this mix into the ziplock bags
  3. Seal and place in freezer overnight
  4. *Try to get as much air out of the bag as you can before you seal the bag
  5. Optional: You can add some food colouring to the syrup if you want to ensure people know it’s not for consuming!
  • Sponge

This is by far the easiest way to make your own icepack! This one is great for lunches as there are no harsh substances that could find their way into your food and even when defrosted the sponge will hold water so it shouldn’t be messy. All you need is a clean sponge, some water and a ziplock bag.

  1. Take a clean sponge and run it under some water
  2. Squeeze it out, just a little bit, so that the sponge is not dripping
  3. Place the sponge in a ziplock bag of an appropriate size
  4. Optional: Some suggest that the ziplock bag is not necessary as when defrosted the sponge should not leak – however to be on the safe side it is probably best to use one.

What do you think of these ideas? Will you try them out?

  1. Best one I know is rice bags. Fill a sock with rice and tie.Freeze for cold pack or pop in microwave for a few mins for heat!

  2. Get Ice Packs for nothing. Talk to your chemist. They get ice packs every day which by law can’t be reused so they go to the garbage.

    I got a stack of different sized ones which I keep in the freezer. B|

  3. I fill up small hot water bottles and freeze them for my elderly mother when her feet and legs give her trouble. The larger ones in the summer use to pack an Eski to keep food and drinks cold. No messy water to clean up and stay cold and iced all day.

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