Why do I keep forgetting faces and names? 1



View Profile

When my mum started forgetting things, we all would just laugh and say, “Oh Mum”. We were all brought up to think that when you get older, you just lose your marbles a bit. But when she was diagnosed with dementia, that’s when we realised memory loss was nothing to joke about. So imagine how upset I was when I forgot where I’d parked my car a few months ago. I got into a blind panic. I didn’t think I’d truly lost it, but just feeling so stupid and lost made it all worse. I kept racking my brain for a clue but was coming up empty.

It wasn’t the first time I’d forgotten obvious things though. I’d been forgetting the names of my neighbours, friends, family members – you name it. I even went to the shops and saw an old friend but was too embarrassed to say hello because I could not for the life of me remember her name. But then there’s the people who come up to me and say hello and I feel like I’ve never see them in my life but should know who they are.

I went and got all the tests done because I was worried, and I’m in the clear. Half of me wished that there was really something wrong just so I could excuse myself for being so forgetful. My own father was sharp as a tack until he died, so I felt like I couldn’t just put it down to age, either.

The worst thing about having memory loss is feeling like you’re letting people down. I have to keep asking my son when he’s travelling overseas. I have to keep asking when he is finishing work. And he’s sick of it. It hurts because he thinks that I’m just not listening when he talks… but little does he realise that I so care and I so want to remember. So in the last few weeks I’ve been doing brain training games and doing some more crosswords. I even joined a puzzles group at my local senior citizens centre and I think it’s been helping out so far. Other members say that they too have been having trouble concentrating and remembering things. I hope it works because I’m sick of feeling confused and forgetful.

Is anyone else?

Guest Contributor

  1. You might be deficient in Zinc. In one study in which elderly patients with mental health problems were given 27 milligrams of zinc daily, improvements in memory, understanding, communication, and social contact were incredible
    Conditions associated with Zinc deficiency: Frequent and/or severe infections. Sleep and behavioral disturbances, Delayed wound healing.
    Psychiatric Illness. Inflammatory bowel disease. Impaired glucose tolerance. Malabsorption syndromes. Reduced appetite. Anorexia. Growth retardation. Loss of sense of smell or taste. Delayed sexual maturation. Night blindness. Impotence, infertility .All dermatological disorders. Abnormal menstruation. Dandruff and hair loss. Alcohol and drug abuse. Connective tissue disease. Diuretic usage. Rheumatoid arthritis. (Treatment of Alzheimer’s disease by zinc compounds. Drug Develop Res, 27, 1-14.)
    The form of zinc used should be one that is easily absorbed, such as zinc citrate, gluconate, picolinate, acetate, or monomethionine.  The supplementation usually must take place for at least 12 weeks in order to achieve good results, and the dosage should be 30 to 45 milligrams daily.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *