Common over-the-counter pill linked to huge increased risk of dementia

Scientist have discovered a common pill taken by millions of people around the world can increase your chance of developing
Health

Scientist have discovered a common pill taken by millions of people around the world can increase your chance of developing dementia by 44 per cent.

The pill is used to aid indigestion and is readily available over the counter. The study showed that elderly patients taking the proton pump inhibitor drugs, or PPIs were more likely to develop dementia than those who did not take the medication.

The pill is taking for digestive issues, such as gastroesophageal reflux and peptic ulcers, as well as indigestion and works to restrict the amount of acid produced in the stomach.

According to the German researchers people who used PPIs at least once every three months had a 44 per cent increased risk of dementia compared with those who did not take the drugs.

The researchers said their study, published the journal JAMA Neurology, had limitations because they had not been able to separate the different risk factors for dementia in each patient.

However, they noted that previous research has shown that people who take PPIs are often vitamin B12 deficient, which is a known risk factor for neurological damage.

Have you ever taken these pills? Do you worry about developing conditions like dementia?

  1. Gail Robertson

    Just another reason I am thankful I seem to have the constitution of a Mule. Have never had any problems that have required a regular dose of anything.

    • Gail Robertson

      Yes I know…but enjoying it while it lasts. The only down side is that because I appear to be ‘bullet proof’ it leads to complacentcy and I take it all for granted. If I had to look after myself for a ‘reason’ I would…but I constantly go. ‘Nah I’ll be right”.

  2. Gail Robertson

    Just another reason I am thankful I seem to have the constitution of a Mule. Have never had any problems that have required a regular dose of anything.

    • Gail Robertson

      Yes I know…but enjoying it while it lasts. The only down side is that because I appear to be ‘bullet proof’ it leads to complacentcy and I take it all for granted. If I had to look after myself for a ‘reason’ I would…but I constantly go. ‘Nah I’ll be right”.

  3. Gail Robertson

    Just another reason I am thankful I seem to have the constitution of a Mule. Have never had any problems that have required a regular dose of anything.

  4. Gail Robertson

    Just another reason I am thankful I seem to have the constitution of a Mule. Have never had any problems that have required a regular dose of anything.

    • Gail Robertson

      Yes I know…but enjoying it while it lasts. The only down side is that because I appear to be ‘bullet proof’ it leads to complacentcy and I take it all for granted. If I had to look after myself for a ‘reason’ I would…but I constantly go. ‘Nah I’ll be right”.

    • Starts at 60

      Hi there, the pills are called ‘proton pump inhibitors’ or PPIs. It’s mentioned in the second paragraph :). Not exactly the most straight forward name but that’s what the doctors call it 🙂

      • June Montgomery  

        Nexus is a prescription medication, can’t be bought across the counter.

    • Vee Brennan

      Carolyn Girdwood Thanks Caroline. Sorry if i wasn’t clear enough in my post Starts at Sxity.

    • Starts at 60

      Hi All, we appreciate your feedback. We provide as thorough information as we can without trying to “make it up”. We have to be very careful with brand mentions. I am sure you recognise that pharmaceutical brands are some of the most powerful in the world and we don’t want to be at the end of a misrepresentation law suit. We get our information from medical journals. There is a reason they don’t publish explicit product brands also I imagine… Note in the article that the journal source is referenced and that it refers to a sample size of 75000 people. Rebecca

    • Jeff Kogler

      Heavens to Betsy. Needing every brand name is like saying you need the make of every car before you’ll accept that cars are involved in road accidents. Also some of those brands named are not available over the counter afaik.

    • Leanna Stephenson

      Omeprazole (OTC; brand names: Gasec, Losec, Prilosec, Zegerid, ocid, Lomac, Omepral, Zolppi, Omez, Omepep, UlcerGard, GastroGard, Altosec)
      Lansoprazole (brand names: Prevacid, Zoton, Monolitum, Inhibitol, Levant, Lupizole)
      Dexlansoprazole (brand name: Kapidex, Dexilant)
      Esomeprazole (brand names: Nexium, Esotrex, esso)
      Pantoprazole (brand names: Protonix, Somac, Forppi, Pantoloc, Pantozol, Pantomed, Zurcal, Zentro, Pan, Controloc, Tecta)
      Rabeprazole (brand names: AcipHex, Pariet, Erraz, Zechin, Rabecid, Nzole-D, Rabeloc, Razo, Superia. Dorafem: combination with domperidone[citation needed]).
      Ilaprazole (not FDA approved as of October 2013; brand names: Noltec, Yili’an, Ilapro, Lupilla, Adiza) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton-pump_inhibitor

    • Starts at 60

      Hi there, the pills are called ‘proton pump inhibitors’ or PPIs. It’s mentioned in the second paragraph :). Not exactly the most straight forward name but that’s what the doctors call it 🙂

    • Vee Brennan

      Carolyn Girdwood Thanks Caroline. Sorry if i wasn’t clear enough in my post Starts at Sxity.

    • Starts at 60

      Hi All, we appreciate your feedback. We provide as thorough information as we can without trying to “make it up”. We have to be very careful with brand mentions. I am sure you recognise that pharmaceutical brands are some of the most powerful in the world and we don’t want to be at the end of a misrepresentation law suit. We get our information from medical journals. There is a reason they don’t publish explicit product brands also I imagine… Note in the article that the journal source is referenced and that it refers to a sample size of 75000 people. Rebecca

    • Jeff Kogler

      Heavens to Betsy. Needing every brand name is like saying you need the make of every car before you’ll accept that cars are involved in road accidents. Also some of those brands named are not available over the counter afaik.

    • Leanna Stephenson

      Omeprazole (OTC; brand names: Gasec, Losec, Prilosec, Zegerid, ocid, Lomac, Omepral, Zolppi, Omez, Omepep, UlcerGard, GastroGard, Altosec)
      Lansoprazole (brand names: Prevacid, Zoton, Monolitum, Inhibitol, Levant, Lupizole)
      Dexlansoprazole (brand name: Kapidex, Dexilant)
      Esomeprazole (brand names: Nexium, Esotrex, esso)
      Pantoprazole (brand names: Protonix, Somac, Forppi, Pantoloc, Pantozol, Pantomed, Zurcal, Zentro, Pan, Controloc, Tecta)
      Rabeprazole (brand names: AcipHex, Pariet, Erraz, Zechin, Rabecid, Nzole-D, Rabeloc, Razo, Superia. Dorafem: combination with domperidone[citation needed]).
      Ilaprazole (not FDA approved as of October 2013; brand names: Noltec, Yili’an, Ilapro, Lupilla, Adiza) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton-pump_inhibitor

    • Starts at 60

      Thanks Leanna – sometimes it is better if we let the community join in – the legals in this world are bigger than a small business can bear

  5. Susan Podger

    Just another nonsense report that even admits it has not taken into consideration all the possible risk factors influencing dementia. So statistically incorrect and misleading !

    • Anne Ogilvie

      Hardly nonsense; a correlation is not necessarily a cause, as they admit, but the link seemed strong enough to mention, along with the vitamin deficiency. Alzheimers research is fairly new & has a long way to go before probable causes can be defined.

  6. Susan Podger

    Just another nonsense report that even admits it has not taken into consideration all the possible risk factors influencing dementia. So statistically incorrect and misleading !

    • Anne Ogilvie

      Hardly nonsense; a correlation is not necessarily a cause, as they admit, but the link seemed strong enough to mention, along with the vitamin deficiency. Alzheimers research is fairly new & has a long way to go before probable causes can be defined.

  7. Julia Metcalfe

    Oh crap! Something else to worry about. Do I take pantoprazole or lie awake in agony?

    • Julia Metcalfe

      Kathy Hanson doesn’t make any difference. If this class of drug is implicated in dementia, then it bothers me. OTC or not.

    • Debbie Bryant

      Julia Metcalfe If not taking your medication leaves you in agony then of course you should take it. This research is in its infancy and next year further research could very well debunk this theory. Look at eggs, in the 70s my mother was scared to eat eggs because they were so bad for cholesterol. Now eggs are good for you. She loved eggs and she denied herself eggs because she did not want to have a heart attack. She did not eat eggs or cake or butter or anything with the tiniest bit of fat. Guess what she died of heart failure at 82. Take your medication and have a good talk to your doctor.

  8. Julia Metcalfe

    Oh crap! Something else to worry about. Do I take pantoprazole or lie awake in agony?

    • Julia Metcalfe

      Kathy Hanson doesn’t make any difference. If this class of drug is implicated in dementia, then it bothers me. OTC or not.

    • Debbie Bryant

      Julia Metcalfe If not taking your medication leaves you in agony then of course you should take it. This research is in its infancy and next year further research could very well debunk this theory. Look at eggs, in the 70s my mother was scared to eat eggs because they were so bad for cholesterol. Now eggs are good for you. She loved eggs and she denied herself eggs because she did not want to have a heart attack. She did not eat eggs or cake or butter or anything with the tiniest bit of fat. Guess what, she died of heart failure at 82. Take your medication and have a good talk to your doctor.

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